Heroin Addiction in New York City: More Overdoses Than Murders

The plague of heroin addiction in New York City is destroying communities in all five boroughs along with the surrounding suburbs. This NYC heroin epidemic is leaving a death toll behind that continues to increase year by year, prompting law enforcement, state officials, and treatment programs to coordinate efforts in a fight against heroin addiction in New York City and throughout the state. Let’s break down the statistics in the NYC heroin epidemic and take an inside look at what is being done to combat this rise in heroin deaths.

The top DEA law enforcement officer for the New York District, Special Agent-in-Charge James Hunt has called the NYC heroin epidemic an unprecedented disaster that is destroying countless communities in a segment that aired on The Cats Roundtable on AM-970 radio:

“New York City and the whole United States are going through a heroin and opiate epidemic unlike we’ve never seen before…The Mexican drug cartels have taken over the importation of heroin into the United States.”

The DEA is working diligently to stop heroin abuse across New York City and the flow of Mexican heroin into the boroughs and suburbs of the Big Apple, but the cartels and drug dealers are often a step ahead. They have innovative ways of avoided law enforcement detection and operate in the shadows. Heroin addiction in New York City is taking a toll on emergency response services as there are more heroin overdose deaths and addicts in need of help than ever before.

Heroin addiction in New York City and the surrounding suburbs is reaching new heights, as heroin deaths and drug overdoses are soaring without any end in sight. NYPD Chief of Detectives Robert Boyce explains the crisis and puts the statistics into perspective:

“Last year, we had approximately 1,200 overdoses. Now, if you look at that versus our homicide rate – it’s 335. It’s almost four times as much.”

With over 1,200 overdoses in 1 year, officials say that part of the problem is economics as heroin overdoses in NYC continue to rise. Many heroin addicts start off addicted to prescription pain pills, but because heroin is so much cheaper, stronger, and readily available, they move into heroin addiction. We know that heroin is often cut with even stronger substances like fentanyl and carfentanil, which are hundreds of times more potent than heroin by itself.

The solution for stopping heroin addiction in New York City and lowering heroin death rates across the country lies in offering drug rehab that is evidence-based and focused on relapse prevention. The most successful treatment methods include process group therapy and individual counseling which allow therapists to explore and heal the root causes of a person’s addiction.

Many people who develop a substance use disorder find it very difficult to stop using without professional help. If you have decided to seek treatment for yourself or a loved one, you’ll need to decide on the type of treatment that’s right for you. Let’s begin the recovery process and create a personalized treatment plan that is tailored to fit your unique needs. Contact us for a free confidential assessment right now.

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