Heroin Addiction in New York City: More Overdoses Than Murders

The plague of heroin addiction in New York City is destroying communities in all five boroughs along with the surrounding suburbs. This NYC heroin epidemic is leaving a death toll behind that continues to increase year by year, prompting law enforcement, state officials, and treatment programs to coordinate efforts in a fight against heroin addiction in New York City and throughout the state. Let’s break down the statistics in the NYC heroin epidemic and take an inside look at what is being done to combat this rise in heroin deaths.

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Carfentanil in Long Island: Deadly New Synthetic Opioid

The possibility of carfentanil in Long Island has become a real scenario as this deadly new synthetic opioid pushes itself across the Northeast. Mainly used as a large animal tranquilizer, carfentanil is illegal for human consumption and has no approved medical uses. It is unsuitable for human use because of its’ strength; the potency of carfentanil makes it up to 10,000 times stronger than morphine and up to 100 times stronger than its’ cousin fentanyl.

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Does PPO Insurance Cover Rehab?

For addicts, families, loved ones, and friends, maneuvering around the addiction treatment process can be confusing, especially in the early stages of admissions and intake. If you’re considering a couple different drug rehab programs, then it’s important to know if your treatment stay is covered by addiction health insurance. You don’t want to receive an unexpected healthcare bill, and we totally understand that. Depending on what kind of coverage and policy your insurance is set up with, we’ve heard many individuals ask the question: does PPO insurance cover rehab? We’ve created a guide that will help you with the answers you’re looking for and provide sound advice so that you make the right decision to improve your life.

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Why do people get addicted to drugs?

It’s a question that has puzzled people for years and just recently we’re discovering how brain chemistry plays a role in substance abuse disorders. The motivating forces behind drug addiction are an age-old question with no definite answers. There are many reasons for why people become addicted to drugs and each addict’s story is unique. The underlying reasons for drug abuse often involve mental health disorders, family history, and socioeconomic factors. Sometimes people just like to get high until it becomes a habit and physical dependency kicks in. If you or a loved one are affected by this and you’re wondering why do people get addicted to drugs, this article can help you gain insight into the matter.

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Why are Opiates Physically Addictive?

The warm fuzzy feeling. The fleeting euphoria. The overwhelming content and relaxation. Sound familiar? If you’re an opiate addict, this is what you’re always chasing…day in and day out. However, it soon becomes a nightmare and misery takes over. Have you ever asked yourself why are opiates so addictive? Why do they take such a strong hold on us and don’t let go? The answer is just as scientific as it is simple. First, we have to understand what happens once opiates cross the blood-brain barrier. Getting to know the science behind how opiates work gives us a better understanding of their addictive and dangerous properties.

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